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  • Service Reopens Comment Period on Wolf Proposal
    by kcsg.com news
    Published - 02/07/14 - 02:24 PM | 5 5 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Gray Wolf
    Gray Wolf
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    (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - Following receipt of an independent scientific peer review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the comment period on its proposal to list the Mexican wolf as an endangered subspecies and remove the gray wolf from the Endangered Species List. The Service is making that report available for public review, and, beginning Monday, February 10, interested stakeholders will have an additional 45 days to provide information that may be helpful to the Service in making a final determination on the proposal.

    The independent scientific peer review was hosted and managed by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), a highly respected interdisciplinary research center at the University of California – Santa Barbara. At the Service’s request, NCEAS sponsored and conducted a peer review of the science underlying the Service’s proposal.

    “Peer review is an important step in our efforts to assure that the final decision on our proposal to delist the wolf is based on the best available scientific and technical information,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “We thank the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis for conducting a transparent, objective and well-documented process. We are incorporating the peer review report into the public record for the proposed rulemaking, and accordingly, reopening the public comment period to provide the public with the opportunity for input.”

    The peer review report is available online, along with instructions on how to provide comment and comprehensive links relating to the proposal, at www.fws.gov/home/wolfrecovery.

    The Service intends that any final action resulting from this proposed rule will be based on the best available information. Comments and materials we receive, as well as some of the supporting documentation used in preparing this proposed rule, are available for public inspection at www.regulations.gov under the docket number FWS–HQ–ES–2013–0073.

    The Service will post all comments on www.regulations.gov. This generally means the agency will post any personal information provided through the process. The Service is not able to accept email or faxes. Comments must be received by midnight on March 27.

    The Federal Register publication of this notice is available online at www.fws.gov/policy/frsystem/default.cfm by clicking on the 2014 Proposed Rules under Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants.

    The Service expects to make final determination on the proposal by the end of 2014.

    Comments
    (5)
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    julie v.
    |
    February 11, 2014
    I find it sad that we need to protect ALL animals or they will be killed. Stop the wolf killing now. Man always comes up with an excuse to kill anything. They are not right in this case.
    Jayne Miller
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    February 11, 2014
    What is the point of saving them from extinction if we are just going to kill them again?? Am I the only one that sees something wrong with this??
    rebecca pressnall
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    February 10, 2014
    So tired of the war against the wolves. In the few states they inhabit man is trying to kill them all. Facts show that deer population isnt brought down by wolves for food but by man. Farmers are reimbursed for any stock that is killed by a wolf. Quite frankly I am ashamed to be human as humans continue to destroy nature and its inhabitants.
    Candy Copeland
    |
    February 08, 2014
    "by the end of 2014" !! Do you know how many more Wolves will be slaughtered by then! OMG!
    Treehugger64
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    February 10, 2014
    "By the end of 2014" - at least until THEN no more states can start any wolf hunting seasons! They will keep on killing in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming anyway, until they succeed in near-exterminating their wolf populations and get UNDER the minimum number required to prevent RE-listing in the Northern Rockies - where wolves ALREADY ARE delisted, giving the whole world a shining example of the treatment of barely recovered endangered species in the USA. The "recovery of the Mexican Grey Wolf" will not be a success story either - NOT the way it is handled by USFWS. What they are proposing is a lame excuse for trying to recover a critically endangered species in it's natural habitat. In the meantime, the equally endangered Red Wolf is simply poached back into the status "extinct in the wild". It would be NICE if USFWS could FINALLY take up it's job again: To protect and recover endangered species and threatened habitats according to ESA, instead of catering to the whims and wishes of wealthy minorities and certain political forces!
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